LA Times: Mulligan Investigates “Stem Cell Clinics” for Class Action

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DSC_0458In an article published August 19, 2016, the LA Times reports on the proliferation of “stem cell clinics” in America. The Times finds that the treatments – which generally consist of injecting patients with stem cells drawn from their own body fat – are expensive and unproven. The concern is that these treatments are marketed with heavy-handed tactics by some clinics to the most vulnerable in our society, those with degenerative, disabling or incurable diseases.  Clinics promise treatment or cures for patients’ ailments with no proof that the treatment is safe or effective, no FDA approval, and a price tag in the thousands, or tens of thousands of dollars.

The article quotes Mulligan, Banham & Findley founding partner, Jan Mulligan, on the firm’s current class action investigation into these clinics:

“Stem cell scientists include the best and the brightest doing great work, and I admire them…. At the other end of the scale, there’s snake oil.”

The article also draws from a recent “stem cell tourism” study by UC Davis stem cell scientist Paul Knoepfler, and bioethicist Leigh Turner of the University of Minnesota. Their study found 570 U.S. clinics now marketing these unproven stem cell interventions, with “hot spots” in Southern California, Phoenix, New York, San Antonio and Austin, Texas.

See the full LA Times article here.

Our firm continues to investigate this important issue, including claims of false advertising, violations of consumer protection statutes, fraud and misrepresentation by stem cell clinics.  If you feel you were harmed or misled by a stem cell clinic in California, please contact us using the button at the bottom of this page, or call 619-238-8700.  See this page for more information.

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